AUTOCANNIBAL DESCRIBES THE EXCESSES OF MODERN DAY LIFE



Addiction, obesity, corruption, over-consumption. Why do we do things that we know are

bad for us? On all fronts, Homo sapiens seem to be intent on wiping themselves out.


Well known and much lauded by lovers of bizarre and provocative performance, Mitch

Jones (aka Captain Ruin) brings Melbourne audiences a premiere Australian work

this July at TheatreWorks. Joined by international emerging Director, star Cirque Du

Soleil aerialist and character performer, Masha Terentieva, AutoCannibal heralds a powerful

new evolution in Jones’ creative practice, drawing on years of experience making avant-

garde performance art for fetish clubs and art installations. 


“In 2016 a very dear friend and mentor passed away while dealing with issues of

addiction,” explains creator and performer Mitch Jones.


A solo physical theatre work, AutoCannibal draws together elements of clowning, circus,

performance art, aerial rigging and sound design. It explores ideas of resource consumption,

environmental exhaustion and social collapse through an examination of the human

impulse towards self-destruction. What will we eat when we’ve consumed it all?


Playing from the 10th to the 21st of July at Theatre Works in St Kilda, AutoCannibal is

emotionally compelling, visually spectacular, and completely original.


Not to be missed - see AutoCannibal:


DETAILS 

Dates: 10 -21 July 2019

Time:  times vary – see website for full details

Location:  Theatre Works - 14 Acland Street, St Kilda

Theatre Works Website




Review

AutoCannibal is set in a post-apocalyptic wasteland, where seemingly resources have been

depleted and the protagonist must survive in this unforgiving environment. In this do-or-die

situation, Mitch Jones takes us through a sequence of physical and psychological survival

attempts and we experience his travails in front of us.


Jones scavenges for resources; the land is barren, not a drop of water to quench his thirst,

the tap is dry. Depleting his energy in an attempt to perspire, Jones flails around the stage

with great acrobatic feats in desperation to quench his thirst with his own bodily fluids. We are reminded of our own moments of pure desperation and what lengths we will go to survive.


Jones thoroughly entertains us. A one-man show with little to no dialogue, he takes us on a

journey of loneliness, isolation, desperation and surrender. His physical theatre performance draws you in, you believe him, and it’s visceral.


The undertones of environmental and social collapse highlight current issues our planet

faces today. AutoCannibal is witty and dark. It makes us look at self-destruction, the

pressure we put on our environment and the tribulations we put our mind and body

through.


Rating: 9/10